Posts Tagged ‘SIV’

Based on how long ago I posted my last blog, lots of people are wondering what is happening,

It was a very busy summer with paragliding, ultralight flying, working with TrappeurHomes.com and ColumbiaRiverPaddle.com. The summer flew by, and it is hard to believe it is almost winter.

14324693_638255199686257_4880238975730397751_oSo, what’s new with flyingMax?

Besides certifying new pilots, running a SIV at Whitetale Lake, doing “Discovery” flights with my Quicksilver ultralight, guiding in the Dolomite’s, visiting a SIV workshop in Annecy and attending the Nova pilots meet, I renewed my paragliding instructor rating and accepted the invite as a Senior paragliding instructor.

For my instructor re-certification course I traveled to Claudio Mota in Drayton Valley, AB. It was the best thing I ever did and was able to brush up my towing skills.

 

Everything feels like all the pieces are falling into the right places:

  • 14089111_10206789387190018_3139404025204207449_nRe-connected with my old friend Juergen Kraus to get all the support to run a “soft” SIV at Whitetale lake.
  • Working more extensively with the Quicksilver in regards to Ultralight flying and instructions.
  • Re-certification instructor course with Claudio Mota and brushing up my towing skills.
  • Accepting the “Senior” instructor status to to be more involved with the HPAC instructor certifications.
  • purchased a “Scooter” winch (650cc Suzuki)
    • to offer another option to “foot” launch for supervised P2 flights.
    • use the winch for teaching powered paragliding
  • got approved as a Transport Canada Ultralight School in the Columbia Valley (Flight Training Unit #5031)

Based on all the above pieces falling in place, I have the following plans for 2017:

  • 14524378_647306515447792_3957626501152488156_oFor the 2016/2017 ski season
    • signed a contract with Panorama Mt. Resort to fly tandems at least 5 days a week
    • offer ski launch workshops
    • offer supervised P2 flights for P1 pilots
  • Powered Paragliding lessons
    • Running Ultralight Ground School (min 20 hours)
    • Practical PPG lessons
  • Run a paragliding instructor course in the early spring
    • Instructor course based on the on the minimum HPAC requirements
    • Instructor course including ultralight ground school, HAGAR course and practical instructional tips (1 week)
  • Run one P1 course through the College of the Rockies in early spring.
  • Plan to run another “soft” SIV in May
  • Explore the Alps tour in September

Happy landings to everyone and looking forward to the next season.

Max & Penny

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It was pretty much a seamless switch from flying with ski’s at Panorama to Mt. Swansea in the valley.

In the mean team the College of the Rocky Mountains were hosting a couple P1 courses and we currently running a P2 program for the new P1 pilots.

Now coming up we are running a

Security In Flight and P2 flights at Whitetail Lake BC

Date: June 17th -19th
Location: Whitetail Lake, BC
Instructors: Max Farndel & Patric Stettler

This unique opportunity to learn the dynamics and limits of your wing will be held at the beautiful private flying site of Whitetail Lake in BC. This site offers a generous amount of height to practice maneuvers over the safety of water. During the evenings, there will be lectures on cross country strategies, weather, and air regulations. There will be two instructors, a safety boat and video. There are also a variety of ways to participate. There is a maximum number of people that can take part in the course. All courses include shuttle rides to launch, life vests, two BBQ dinners, two breakfasts, and camping at Whitetale Lake.

We only have a couple spots left and they will run out fast.
Click here for more details at

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College of the Rockies

takeoff practice hill

practice hill

Kimpten Practice Hill

 

Originally the SIV was scheduled to be at the Gardasee in Italy but due the bad weather in the southern Alps, Nova was able to move the workshop to the Achensee (just north of the Alps). First it did not look very good as the Foehn (Chinook) was building up and we had some gusty and windy conditions in the morning. It still turned out we could do up to 4 flights on Saturday and 3 flights on Sunday, which was very surprising. Walter Holzmuller was running the workshop and did a great job as all the discussions and maneuvers were practice related.The interesting statistics about SIV (Simulated

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Incidence in flight/Vol) was that tr there is a huge percentage of experienced cross-country pilots (flying at least 10-25 years) have never done a SIV course. It seams like that the biggest percentage of SIV participants are flying for 3-5 year. The most what I got out of the workshop was the different types of methods to get down to the ground fast. Here are the different methods: 1] The most common one is “Big Ears”. This gets you down with up to 12 m/sec (only with 3 liners, not 2 liners). Keep in mind, going down faster does not mean gaining more ground speed/airspeed, if anything, you are flying slower. A lot of pilots use this method thinking they fly faster to fly away from something, which is not true. “Big Ears” work very well, but can not be used as an overall maneuver to get down. Sometimes it is better to fly away as fast as possible from big lift and then spiral down instead of staying in big lift with “Big Ears”. 2] “B-line stall” which is not recommend anymore as it can lead to a “kravatte” and maybe gives you about 12 m/sec sink. Check your manufactures manual, some advice not to fly “B-line stalls” at all. 3] A “deep Spiral” can achieve more then 20 m/sec, but it creates a lot of g-forces and can lead to black outs and can be rough to do in turbulent air.

4] The most interesting maneuver was the 60% asymmetric collapsed spiral dive. With this spiral dive you have less g-forces and a stable decent of more then 25 m/sec in turbulent conditions. I was very surprised to experience how stable and save this spiral is. My big worry was to get into trouble with lines getting caught in the canopy during this maneuver or when stopping it. But based on the experiences the SIV schools had, there are no incidents like that at all. The most important result of this workshop was learning about the asymmetric collapsed spiral dive and to be able to practice it over water. Thanks again to Walter Holzmuller, Mik Brochard, Toni Bender and Nova to put this on for us.